The Tugboat Swell

The Tugboat Swell after restoration

The Tugboat Swell is one of Commodore’s Boats flagship restoration projects and one we are very proud of. The Tugboat Swell was a complete restoration and a project that lasted approximately 18 months.

The following work has been done to convert this 1912 built tug into a sports fishing passenger vessel:

– taken approximately 12 inches of hog out of keel
– installation of 6 double ensuite state rooms
– lengthening and widening of the stern with a new horn timber to compensate for the heavier top weight of the extra accommodations
– install new main power & two 40kw gensets for fishing
– bow stem replacement
– reframe & replank 2/3 of vessel
– new deck beams & deck
– new bulwarks & caprails
– all new sawn frames from deck down an average of 8 ft.
– new shelves

Read more

The Schooner Maple Leaf

Maple Leaf and Swell

The Schooner Maple Leaf

Maple Leaf is a classic, 92-foot schooner. Commodore’s Boats has been working closely with Maple Leaf Adventures to ensure that this classic is maintained and restored. Currently the Maple Leaf is in for a stern replacement and restoration.

Maple Leaf is a classic, 92-foot schooner (BC’s historic tall ship) was built in 1904 in Vancouver Shipyard at Coal Harbour. She was designed and built by William Watts, a well-known Canadian shipbuilder and designer.
Completely restored from 1980-1986 to new condition,Maple Leaf is fully inspected and certified by the Canadian Coast Guard as a passenger vessel, and is manned by a certified, competent crew. She is fully-equipped with the latest safety and navigation equipment including radar, G.P.S., E.P.I.R.B., radio-telephone and satellite communications.

 

Read more

Toke Point – Aluminum Sponson

sponson wrap towards the bow

FV Toke Point – Aluminum Sponson

Purchased in Alaska and brought to Richmond, owner Ron Tucker a crab fisherman out of Tokeland Washington has commissioned commodore’s Boats to sponson his new vessel. Sponsons on this boat are utilized to help stabilize the craft in choppy water or high wind conditions, or both. The sponsons also serve another purpose in that it increases overall deck work space and allows greater area to house crab traps. This makes the boat much more efficient and overall safer.

Read more

Confidence I – full recaulk on 82′ wooden fish boat

Confidence

Confidence I – full recaulk on 82′ wooden fish boat

Confidence I spent a few months with Commodore’s Boats in the summer of 2016 for a full recaulk. New planks added, oakum and cotton pounded into all the seams. While staying at Shelter Island the owners of Confidence Fishing Company also decided to beef up the rolling chocks and shorten the stern ramp significantly. CSI work was performed including servicing of all valves and shaft and rudder work. Commodore’s mechanic also did some work on the steering system. All said and done Confidence I was in the shipyard for the better part of the summer and was launched in October 2016 without a hitch.

Read more

Haida Legend – former Skeena Cloud 45 ‘ wood fish boat

Haida Legend

Skeena Cloud arrived on late 2016 for a 5 month refit. With this vessel Commodore’s Boats established areas of rot in the wooden bulwarks, deck and wheel house. As a result most of the wood was replaced with aluminum without losing the look and lines of the original boat. A new aluminum command station was added along with electrical and hydraulic upgrades. Customer wanted to extend the stern ramp and ultimately renamed the vessel to Haida Legend.

Read more

Research Vessel Achiever – 70′ steel hulled sloop

Achiever

A dedicated research vessel, Achiever, is a coast guard certified 70 ft, steel hulled sloop that operates seven months a year on the BC coast. The boat can be fit to provide observer platforms, oceanographic equipment, freezer space, and other research specific requirements. It can accommodate up to 10 people and has substantial water and fuel capacity. The vessel undertakes research programs for the Raincoast Conservation Foundation and partners with other research organizations such as the Institute of Ocean Sciences, the University of British Columbia, and Simon Fraser University.

Read more

Pacific Wanderer – 65′ Fibreglass Pleasurecraft

Pacific wanderer Fibreglass pleasure craft

Just arrived the 1980 built “PACIFIC WANDERER” is a 65’ Maple Leaf custom ketch  bluewater offshore cruiser, designed by Stan Huntingford built by Marcos Yachts Inc,. This former RVYC vessel has been sitting idle for several years and the new owners have brought it to Commodore’s Boats for an extensive refit.

Read more

Lord Nelson III – 90′ converted Admirals Yacht

Lord Nelson III - full restoration

Lord Nelson III – 90′ converted Admirals Yacht

Lord Nelson III was a another flagship wood boat restoration completed at Commodore’s Boats over an eight month time frame.

History of the Lord Nelson III

To say that the history of the Lord Nelson is is cloudy would be an understatement however here is this writers best account based on research on the internet and with interviewing the current owner Dave Dawson.

Dave believes the vessel was built in 1942 and is stamped to this day with the boatbuilder being Milwaukee Shipbuilding Corp. Built as a 81′ Admirals yacht this boat was almost immediately converted over to a pleasure craft.

Tenora II was purchased by Max Wyman a Seattle businessman best known as active in the lumber business with the Max A. Wyman Lumber Co. amongst many other business ventures. The vessel was extended to 90′ and and ultimately sold to current owner Dave Dawson of Richmond BC, Canada. Dave ultimately renamed this classic beauty in the late 1970’s to Lord Nelson III.

Dave Wyman also was well known for owning the 136-foot yacht Wild Goose II. In 1962 Wyman sold the Wild Goose, a converted minesweeper, to actor John Wayne. Wayne continued to moor the boat in the Northwest as well in Newport California. The Lord Nelson III and the Wild Goose II tended to explore and travel and entertained in the same circles for many years until John Wayne’s death in 1979.

Read more

Steveston Lifeboat

Steveston Lifeboat

In 1944, the Steveston Lifeboat previously known as Artists Life was built by the United States Navy in Pearl Harbor as an Admiral’s barge, reportedly used by Admiral Nimitz as his launch at one time. In 1988, the classic wooden craft was purchased by marine artist and official Canadian naval war artist, John Horton, who uses it as his research vessel to this day. When John isn’t cruising the coast doing research for his next painting, he sails the Steveston Lifeboat on the Fraser River, where the striking orange and blue paint is a familiar sight as it conducts search and rescue and safety patrols, and escorts commercial fishing traffic along the busy waterway. Flying the flag of the Canadian Lifeboat Institution, the Steveston Lifeboat operates out of its home port of Steveston, south of the Vancouver International Airport in Richmond, B.C.

Read more